Introducing Your Baby to Solid Foods

Introducing your baby to solid foods is exciting and rewarding – but it can be difficult to know exactly how and when to get started.

 

When to start?

Your baby should be four months of age at the very least – before this, his immature digestive system will find it difficult to cope with solid food. Most medical professionals, however, will advise waiting until your baby is at least six months of age, to reduce the risk of food allergies.

Your baby’s age is not the only consideration and there are other factors to take into account when determining whether or not the time is right for baby’s first foods.

Look for signs of readiness in your baby – does he watch you with interest when you eat, following the progress of your food from plate to mouth? This increased interest in solid food can indicate that he’s ready to try it for himself.

Does your baby seem dissatisfied after his usual milk feeds, or is he waking at night after previously sleeping through? Although these may be signs of an increase in his appetite, they can also be triggered by discomfort from teething. It is important to try to establish whether or not teething is the cause, to avoid introducing solid foods before your baby really needs them.

Your baby should have good head control and be able to sit well, as this makes swallowing easier. Younger babies may not be able to sit unsupported, however, so it is very important to provide the appropriate support if this is the case.

The decision to introduce solid foods to your baby must ultimately be made by you and your child’s doctor. You may feel pressured by other people – particularly the older generation – to give solid foods to your baby earlier than medical advice recommends. It is important to remember that a great deal of research has been carried out in order to provide this advice and such information simply wasn’t available in the past.

Baby-Led Weaning: The Essential Guide to Introducing Solid Foods

Baby-Led Weaning Book

 

What are the best first foods for baby?

If your baby is ready to start on solid foods, you might be a bit confused as to which foods are best. There are a wide variety of foods that can be good starter foods. Here are some ideas to help you get going.

 

Rice, Mixed Grain or Oat Cereal

This is the typical baby cereal that you mix with formula or breast milk. This is a good starter food because it is easily tolerated and you can make it as thin as you like for those first meals. Start with just about a tablespoon of the cereal.

Try giving this first solid feed around lunch time, but take the edge off your baby’s appetite by giving him some of his usual milk feed before the baby rice. If he is too hungry, he will be frustrated and distressed.

He will respond well to supportive gestures and smiles, so stay relaxed and don’t worry if he pushes the food back out of his mouth! Most babies do this instinctively at first and this “tongue-thrust” reflex will subside as he becomes accustomed to the new and unusual textures he is experiencing.

If he does not seem interested, simply take the food away and try again the next day, or a few days later. You should not try to force him to eat, as this is traumatic for him and will only make things more difficult. After all, there is no rush – at this stage, breastmilk or formula is meeting all of his nutritional needs.

 

Vegetables

Once your baby is comfortably enjoying baby rice, then try introducing pureed, fresh vegetables. It is worth noting that some babies do not like baby rice at all and begin by eating vegetables straight away.

Mild yellow vegetables like squash, carrots and sweet potatoes are good starters, too. They are easy on the stomach and babies usually love the taste.

Introduce only one new vegetable at a time, leaving four days between each new food. This will help you identify any foods that cause an allergic reaction or trigger digestive problems in your baby.

Some good vegetables to introduce as baby’s first foods are butternut squash, sweet potato, carrots, swede (or rutabaga) and white potatoes. These can be boiled or steamed, then pureed. Alternatively, sweet potatoes can be baked in their skins, then the soft flesh scooped out, ready to serve – instant, healthy baby food!

You can try combining different vegetables for some delicious new flavors – examples include parsnips with green beans, sweet potato and squash and swede (or rutabaga) and carrots. The possibilities are endless!

 

Yogurt

Many babies love plain, unsweetened yogurt, and it is a very healthy first food. If your baby doesn’t like it, try yogurt with the fruit on the bottom, but check labels, and buy yogurt with low sugar content. Very often the grocery store brand will be lower in sugar than the national brands.

 

Mild Fruits

Once your baby is enjoying vegetables, you can add fruits to the menu. Good choices include pureed banana, avocado and cooked, pureed apples and pears. Citrus fruits should be avoided for the first year, as they can trigger allergic reactions.

For something really different, try combining fruits and vegetables, such as apples with carrots, or bananas with sweet potato, for some unusual but tempting new flavors.

 

These are some of the best foods to offer first. Many pediatricians recommend offering vegetables, cereals and unsweetened yogurt first and adding fruits and sweetened yogurt a bit later. This is based on the theory that saving sweeter foods for later discourages the development of a sweet tooth.

 

Be certain that you introduce only one new food at a time, and wait a week before introducing something new. This will let you determine if there is any food that your child is allergic to or does not tolerate well.

Once you have introduced the foods above successfully, you can add other vegetables, like green beans and peas, and meat. It is usually recommended that you wait until your baby is older to introduce spinach and broccoli.

 

Beware trying to approach those first few solid meals when your baby is really hungry – he is likely to rebel. Give him just a little breast milk or formula, and he is likely to be much more patient with the process.

Don’t expect much those first few feedings. Your baby will wear more than he will eat for some time. But, it will get better – and these first few meals are more about learning the skill than actual nutrition, anyway!

Above all, have fun introducing baby’s first foods – by selecting and preparing these fresh and wholesome ingredients, you are getting him off to a wonderfully healthy start.

 

How to Introduce Your Baby to Solid Foods

 

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